“Schizophrenic behavior dilutes core brand equity. While it may help in the short term, knee-jerk reactions to the immediate environment can prove detrimental to the long-term value of the brand, especially if they don’t link up to what a brand represents or the bigger brand idea.”

Defying The Genericizing of Brands – BSI

Advertisements

Interesting story in the WSJ this morning about Alec Duffy, the 33 year old theater director from Brooklyn.  Duffy found himself in an opportune position after he won the rights to singer/songwriter Sufjan Steven’s, newest single.  According to the WSJ:

Duffy won the rights to Mr. Stevens’s song in a 2007 contest called the “Great Sufjan Song Xmas Xchange.” Mr. Duffy submitted a song that he wrote — called “Every Day is Christmas” — that Mr. Stevens judged the best. In exchange, Mr. Duffy won the rights to Mr. Stevens’s “The Lonely Man of Winter”…In describing the prize, Mr. Stevens’s Web site said: “Sufjan’s new song becomes your song. You can hoard it for yourself, sell it to a major soft drink corporation, use it in your daughter’s first Christmas video, or share it for free on your Web site. No one except Sufjan and you will hear his song, unless you decide otherwise.”

The contest created by Sufjan is indeed deserving of major props.  It is, however, not a concept that should be seen as terribly mind-blowing, especially in today’s environment.  Artists, or I should say, the artists who intend on surviving in this climate will continue to be the trendsetters in the utilization of social-networking methods and tools that connect with and empower their fans–making them feel like an even larger part of the process.  It is the only way to break through the clutter and engage with the loyal and devoted fans you’ve already hooked in; the only way to maintain your brand’s/band’s reputation.  Releasing a decent recording simply won’t cut it anymore.

For me though, the coolest part of all this was Duffy’s response to his new position of musical-power.  Instead of selling the song for some sort of commercial use–which, I am sure, millions of people would have done if given the opportunity–he sent out an invite on his theater company’s website for fans to come to his home in Brooklyn to listen to the song (on headphones), together.  “The experiment lures strangers to Mr. Duffy’s living room about once a week, to [as he says,] “recapture an era when to get one’s hands on a particular album or song was a real experience.”

Duffy describes Sufjan as “the wizard behind the curtain,” and it’s very cool to me how, without being guided in any way by the artist, he has essentially gone out of his way to perpetuate this artistic perception.  He has taken full responsibility for maintaining the brand’s (Sufjan’s) reputation, almost making it a fulltime job.  It’s an amazing example of a brand’s message being embraced and consequently strengthened by the “consumer,” organically.  Authenticity at it’s best…

My favorite quote of Duffy’s is when he says about the gatherings, “This is the finest way we felt we could curate this song. It brings people together, rather than being lost among 14,000 iTunes.”

I will admit, I’m a bit late in recognizing these ads, but, considering I’ve done a good deal of Starbucks-bashing in the past, I figured it was worth highlighting some of the more positive steps they’ve taken to rebuild their reputation–reinforcing/embracing their positioning and distancing themselves from McDonald’s and the other, more “recession-proof” brand’s which have successfully belittled Starbuck’s overall image and reputation.

Starbucks was never simply about a cup of coffee, it was about “the best” cup of coffee–a taste and experience you couldn’t get anywhere else.  Nobody went there to only get a cheap cup of coffee that would satisfy their fix.  We went there because the whole experience felt focused and authentic, and that comforted you as you dished out a couple extra bucks for your latte.

When the recession hit, things got bad–it could not have been more blatant how nervous Starbucks was about their “luxurious” brand and how it would be viewed by a suddenly more frugal consumer.  McDonald’s harassment didn’t help, and very quickly the Starbucks brand, which was already having trouble staying on-point, felt completely off-balance…

starbucks-ad-heart

starbucks-print-ad-new-york-times

This new series of print ads, however, are a nice step in the right direction.  Instead of fighting with McDonalds on price, these ads explain the central difference between a Starbuck’s cup and the “discount” alternatives.  As a coffee lover myself–someone who likes to think he can tell the difference between a good cup of coffee and a shitty one–the copy, paired with the look and feel they’ve created, really hits home.  Nicely done…